state knife laws

KnifeUp provides, for free, knife law guides for all 50 states. Below is a map of the US, click on the state you are interested in to read about it’s knife laws. I try to keep these guides as up-to-date and accurate as possible but, for the law changes a lot, please leave a comment if you see something wrong.

Choose Your State

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How the US Justice System Works

The United States was founded under the principals of federalism. Under federalism, governing powers are divided between the federal government as well as the state governments. For states existed before the founding of the US, the writers of the Constitution respected the state’s authority by limiting federal powers to only those expressly stated within the Constitution. All other governing powers are, therefore, state powers.

For knife law, the only federal law is the Switchblade Knife Act of 1958 as well as the 2009 amendment to the act (see 15 U.S.C. §1244). The federal knife law only applies to individuals who are traveling internationally as well as between states. If you reside in a federal district (see Washington D.C. knife laws), the federal law is the only law that governs knives for you. If you live in one of the 50 states, the federal law would only apply to you if you are traveling from one state to another or if you are entering federal property, such as a military base.

All states have knife laws (click on the map above to find the knife law for a particular state) but some knife laws by state are more up-to-date than others and local municipals often pass their own knife laws as well. For example, if you live in Denver, Colorado, you must abide by the knife laws of Colorado as well as the knife laws of Denver. However, if you travel to Boulder, Colorado (30 minutes away) you must conform to Boulder’s knife laws as well. And, during your journey, you must conform to the knife laws of all the municipals in between Boulder and Denver.

This makes knife laws by state a tricky subject unless your state has a preemption clause. Preemption means that the state government nullifies all knife laws by state made by municipals. Therefore, when you travel from town to town, you would not have to worry about municipal knife laws.

General Guide to Knife Laws

Knife laws can be divided into these two categories: ownership laws and carry laws.

Ownership Laws

Ownership laws forbid individuals from owning certain types of knives that society has deemed “deadly weapons” or “dangerous.” Most of the time, these knives were once associated with unlawful people such as gangs, the mob, and outlaws. It is for this reason that the Bowie knife has been outlawed in so many states.

Carry Laws

Carry laws forbid an individual from carrying, concealed or open, certain knives. For example, some states forbid an individual from conceal carry of knives over a certain length but open carry of that same knife is legal. Other states forbid the carry, concealed and open, of certain knives. Most knives that are barred from carry are ones deemed by society to have no utility uses and, therefore, their only use is as weapons.

Other Laws

Some states have laws that forbid one from aggravated display of a knife as well as committing a crime with a knife. These laws are usually only enforceable after the fact and, for that reason, allows the state to increase the penalty of a crime. For example, robber is a bad crime but robbery with a knife laws is viewed as an even worse crime and should be punished more than simple robbery.

What is Generally Allowed

If you want to carry a knife laws that is usually legal everywhere, I highly recommend you buy a knife that is clearly intended for utility use. For example, most pocket knives and all leathermans as well as multi-tools fit this description. As long as the blade is less than 3 or 2.5 inches, you should be fine. Times where this advice might not be true is at: courts, planes, schools, and special buildings that forbid the carry of blades.

Comments

  1. When I was 15 I was charged as an adult with multiple non-violent felonies in South Carolina. I currently live in North Carolina and am curious to know if I can legally carry a knife, concealed or open and what type? I read through everything on your page relative to the 2 states, but am still unclear. Thanks

  2. What about a hunting knife that 10 inch with blade and handle together

  3. I just heard a rumor that TSA is allowing SMALL pocket knifes in your CARRY ON. Looking to see how legitimate this is.

    1. Not true at this time. Maybe in the future, but I don’t think so

    2. Joe I’m 16 and I’m in arizona for the summer and I was winder if I was aloud to bring a hunting knife on then plane because in arizona because it was my first Time in arizona but I from Indiana and when I go back I got a delay to Texas then I ho back to Indiana would I be alright bc I got a case for it

  4. Good day,

    My name is Jorge Moya and I am the export manager of Hydra Knives, a new knife making company from Spain.

    I am redacting an inform for our Export Institute from Spain but I am encountering trully difficulties to find the right information.

    I have been days trying to find information about the knife sector from the US, the amount of sales (and money) that the cutlery sector from the US generates; the number of consumers from the US; the volume of importation and exportation products, etc.

    I am not sure if you know where I can find this information or even if you have this information or any information that could help me out; but, if you could lend me a hand here I would trully appreciate it since I am getting mad trying to find any economical information about the cutlery sector of the US.

    Would you be able to help me out? Thanks a lot for your effort and thanks in advance, keep the hard work on, you are trully doing an amazing job.

    Best regards,

    Jorge Moya

  5. I need clarification of Mississippi ‘s knife law. i have a tactical-folder (that i bought for protection after being roughed up at work) and

  6. I recently took at a job at the Census Bureau in Indiana, part of the Dept. of Commerce; I am a Kentucky resident and have a 3.25″ lock-blade. I have a concealed carry permit which is reciprocal in Indiana, but my question is, “Am I allowed to carry the blade, concealed or unconcealed, into the building under federal statute?” The armed federal officer makes me disarm upon my arrival into the building. Thank you sincerely, Bryan Shepherd

    1. I work at a VA facility and according 38 CFR § 1.218 – Security and law enforcement at VA facilities (b)(39), knives should not exceed a blade length of 3 inches – I’m guessing this is pretty typical across other federal locations. I am also in NY (not NY City and NYC has different rules) and have the penal law §265.01 to follow. I found a knife that works for both of these TAC Force TF-903BK Spring Assist folding knife, it’s less than $10 on Amazon and the knife is of decent quality.

    2. You’re not allowed to because of the owner of the building. For example if you wanted to go somewhere that had a no weapons sign on the door but asked the owner of the property, if granted, you can carry there

  7. I have a question regarding knife sales. I’m about to open an online sporting goods store, and I’m sure its illegal to sell knives via my online store to anyone under the age of 18, but I just wanted to make sure before I go and add the annoying age verification to my site when I open it. I have multi-tools, pocket knives, and hunting knives, The biggest of which is a 4.9 in handcrafted Damascus.

  8. Let’s face it.
    It’s illegal unless the guy or gal with the badge say so….

    I can understand why they don’t want any knives in a school or government building.

    What I can’t understand is that if you have a knife large enough where it would be very hard to conceal like a Bowie then why would it be illegal to carry on your hip or on the dash in your car , in PLAIN sight ?

  9. my name is Rick and I have a question about concealed carry of a knife, I do have a concealed carry permit in Florida and what I need to know is what knives are allowed to be concealed carry with a permit.

    1. Hey Rick;

      Thanks for contacting us with your question! Officially my advice is to ask that question to an attorney or para-legal in the state of Florida (or the department from which you received your license). I can’t give you official legal advice, so don’t take my word as authority. I’m just a general guide to point you in the right direction. The only info I found that pertains a bit to your question is found at this link to the government of the state of Florida (Agriculature Dept);

      http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?mode=View%20Statutes&SubMenu=1&App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=concealed+knife&URL=0700-0799/0790/Sections/0790.06.html

      It basically says that you can carry a concealed knife if you have a permit, but the definition of a knife is really limited to a PLASTIC knife, blunt table knife or pocket knife. A pocket knife is a knife with a blade that folds into the handle, and beyond that, the law is vague. So, if you stick to a small pocket knife with a 2-3 inch blade and you have a permit, then you’re fine.

      That’s my non-expert, non-legally binding two cents from experience and research.

      Best of luck my friend,

      J.

  10. Can u carry a knife when u are 12 And less than a figure leathe long

  11. Delete the state law feature. Everyone is telling you how outdated and incorrect the information is. Clearly no one at your magazine is reading these.

  12. You need to update your Texas article. The laws were recently changed and made much more knife friendly for most locations in the state.

  13. Washington, DC, the District of Columbia is not listed. What are the laws for this area.

  14. You know how there is a gun license, is there a throwing knife license or a knife license

  15. Please update the Illinois switchblade laws. It is now legal to own a switchblade in Illinois if you possess a FOID card.

  16. Time to update the site maybe?…. WI and MI laws changed in 2016 and the changes don’t show on your page

  17. You have a paragraph concerning knife laws in Mass saying that if you have a Class A LTC license you can carry a switch blade and most other Knives in Section J of Mass Laws
    I called the Law Library and they cannot find that without more info Could you tell me where you found that info
    Ma.gov sight laws are so vague it can be on individual opinion which is not good

    Thanks

  18. so i live in minnesota and im going on a road trip to hilton head i want to purchase a knife from every state i go to can i get a knife in one state thats illegal in minnesota and bring it back with me?

  19. Is my USMC knife okay? It’s my palm size and has a sheath, but I also am not aware of the type of knife it is. It has 3 functions and a compass on the bottom with a hole to place small objects in, like matches and all. Thank you!

  20. Superb post and thanks for letting me know about the law, I really appreciate for sharing, well can you please also let me know from where I can get Swiss Army Style Knife from ? I’ll be waiting for you’re reply. Thanks 🙂

  21. To KnifesUp.com,

    What is with your site? First I spend all morning replying to EVERY QUESTION ON THIS SECTION pertaining to the Knife laws to try and help out everyone who has been asking the questions you see above. All my answers stated that they were awaiting moderations. I come back later to see if they were ever excepted and not a single one shows up on here? Not one reply was approved? It;s as if you guys could have given a rats ass that I spent all that time replying to each and everyone of these questions because your site has yet to updated the laws in the states that have since revoked the STATE Felony law pertaining to Switchblades. I answered and addressed EVERY concern on here as to what that truly means for people and why you guys may not yet have updated your laws by state to include those that have.

    I understand knife laws better then most, as my business and the success of my company require me to know the knife laws from Federal, Law, to State, to local jurisdictional law. I thought I was helping you guys out by replying to each person and explaining the law, what the change means to them, and what it means in general as well as the expectations that can arrive at from these law changes.

    Yet, my replies are no longer on here awaiting moderation, as they once said. They are all just gone, and I would like an explanation as to why? My replies to EVERY question above answered every question with the facts and the laws, no some assumptions or guesses or my interpretation of the laws, but the actual facts of the laws. Why would you take those responses and just dump them on the floor and not approve them? It it because you guys were not the ones to provide the answers to the questions that were actually direct to you guys here at Knifeup? And your unhappy that someone decided to help out their fellow knife enthusiast and provide them with the cold hard facts of the laws that changed?

    Or is it because my website which you ask for as part of the information you request from people when they reply of leave a comment has a place for a website and I listed my companies website? Did I break some underlying rules by providing my companies Facebook page?

    I don’t know. I feel like I will likely be wasting my time attempting to post this question in the comments section as you no longer have a Contact Us section, Well, let me rephrase, you do, but there is no contact links or info on how to contact you, the contact us page is completely blank.

    My guess is that I am wasting my time writing this, and it will say it is awaiting moderation which will never happen and this question will be dropped on the floor along with ever reply that these people have been requesting from you guys. So I took well over 1 hour answering EVERY Question above that was asked, even though all the questions are old I know many people that still have those same questions and my answers are as relevant today as the questions are. The point I am trying to make is that my answers to these questions that never got any answer to are the same questions, I see people asking everywhere, but you guys are supposed to be the Authority of Knife Laws by State, yet I have found out that your laws as listed state by state are becoming deprecated and need to be updated as many have changed.

    Perhaps if you are not going to let people know the laws as they stand today, you should stop being the Authority on Knife laws since people can not come here and be sure that the laws you have listed are still in effect today (April 20 2017) which means nothing you have listed can be trusted. If you had allowed my answers to the questions asked, you could have gotten a wealth of knowledge to update your laws by state with but now it appears as thought that is too much to ask.

    If you guys by some miracle allow this comment to be posted, I hope that you will be kind enough to reply to me and explain why you did not approve any of my answers. Which were solely based on fact and up to date laws.

    To all who I attempted to provide you with the answers to your laws questions, I did try to provide you with the answers you never for but apparently the moderators of this site felt the need to block my answers from reaching you and would rather provide you misleading and incorrect laws for knives based upon state. So please be careful when replying on a website like this that does not keep their pages updated and blocks the replies of those that do. Please use additional resources to provide you with the accurate laws for the state in question and if need be compare a couple sites to see if you can find a common ground answer which would most likely be the correct one.

    Please feel free to contact me directly at eutopiantraderllc@gmail.com, and I will be happy to answer you personally and provide you with the answers to your questions that you never received answers too.

    Cheers, lets see if this gets published or dropped. If it gets dropped, I will never come to this site for reference again, and I will remove the link to it on my companies educational pages, as well, I will stop instructing my customer to come here for their law answers.

  22. If brass nuckles are illegal in kansas can they still sell them in kansas,and are they legal to buy??

  23. So I think I am confused on these laws. Each state has laws that have a length or type of knife that is illegal. I camp a lot and I travel state to state sometimes with all my gear to go camp in state parks. Now if I have an 8 inch camp knife in my car while traveling is that illegal? or if I’m in a state park and I have that knife hanging from my belt is that illegal? All of these laws seem to only cover cities or towns but I don’t want to be arrested because I was driving through a town with that knife in my car or hiking in a state park while carrying it. am I over thinking this or could these laws ruin a camping trip?

  24. Oh, by the way- be wary of the department policy posing as law. This is becoming more and more prevalent. Once again, unless ratified by city, parish, (yes, I just outed my state) state or federal legislature, it is not law and subject to how loud and hard you want to be. So don’t let a government entity bully you with department policy. Now more than ever, one needs to know what laws govern them and to what extent, because the government loves it when you allow ignorance to give them the ability to walk right over you. I’ve ranted enough for now, goodnight.

  25. I have been tooling around the comments section, and have noticed people asking questions that are not addressed by the laws provided. This vexes me to no end. I can’t speak for other countries, but we are a free nation founded on the ideals of freedom. Our forefathers believed that freedom was inherent to being human. What I’m trying to say is, unless a written law specifically forbids it, then fair game, precedent be damned. Court proceedings do not dictate law. I have noticed the public in general has adapted a “may I?” attitude, and the gov is more than happy to let you continue that way. We are asking permission of a system that is meant to serve us. If it is not expressly documented, then one may engage. LEOs do not dictate law, they simply enforce it. I’m not advocating disrespect, or causing a ruckus just to be a d.b., but if an activity you enjoy is being interfered with just because the powers that be don’t think you should, then by all means rock the boat, cause a ruckus, and declare to all “show me a law”. Until presented and passed by a legislature, it is your right to do as you damn well please. I’m not saying it will be easy or pain free, but stand up and show some of the old blood that bought our freedom.

  26. Most state own/carry knife laws miss the point entirely. A law which merely lists the kind of knives that may be owned or carried does nothing but restrict the freedom of the lawful. It is NO danger to the public if a lawful citizen owns or carries any kind of blade or edged item concealed or open, and such should NOT be restricted. The danger to the public is when a citizen injures another with a knife, or brandishes it in threat while committing a crime, such as robbery or rape, or brandishes it in disregardfor the safety of others. In other words laws should focus on what actions cause harm (stabbing, slashing, brandishing, negligence or reckless behaviors,) NOT on the mere owning or carrying of a knife. Same can be said for guns, it is not the object itself which should be restricted, but the actions of the knife/gun holder. Or in simpler terms, there can be no illegal objects, only illegal actions.

  27. Do you know the importation and selling laws? I’m looking to buy knives over sea and sell them online. Does customs have specific requirements.

  28. Many, if not most, state laws deal with carrying knives in some form or another. For example, while is may be legal in Oklahoma to own many types of knives, it is not legal to carry some of them. As I read the statutes, there is no exception for transporting knives. For example, while I cannot openly carry a dagger, the statutes would also prohibit my transporting a dagger in a locked briefcase, as I might on the way to a show, or in a wrapped package, as I might if taking it to UPS to send to someone else. Can you tell me which state laws specifically equate “carry” and “transport” and which state laws specifically distinguish the act of carrying from the act of transporting? Thank you.

  29. I’m surprised nobody has thought of this, but with the huge upset in the is with gun control (in my opinion is a bunch of b.s.) my intention is to get a 2 to 3 foot sword and a few chakrams for concealed protection. I’m not sure where or why that would be illegal, but I’m sure it is

  30. Your laws for Wi are years out of date. All knives are legal as of 2/4/16 by statute.

  31. Go on YouTube and look up if stiletto switchblades are legal in Texas then you will find news reports saying that they are, according to this website they say they are illegal to carry is this up to date? Somebody please respond. Plus if you have a stiletto switchblade that has a blade length of 6 inches but the cutting length is the legal limit is it legal to carry

    1. The information regarding illegal weapons in Texas, including knives, is defined in Penal Code 46.01. It was changed a couple of years ago to no longer include automatic knives, aka “switchblades” , as well as balisongs (aka “butterfly knives”) under the definition of an illegal knife. However, despite the change in the opening operation legality, knives falling under the definition of dirks, daggers and stilettos are still illegal. Unfortunately, the penal code does not give any definition of what makes a knife one of the offending daggers, stilettos or dirks. Meaning it is open to officer discretion upon the arrest. One cannot rely upon the definitions set forth for these terms in other venues either, which can create a rather vague area. Regardless of fixed blade or folding, the limit of length still remains at 5.5″. Again, officer discretion to measurement can come into play. Regardless of actual cutting edge length, the overall blade length is of concern. So the knife you describe is defined as an illegal knife, on two separate accounts…..one as the blade type, and the other because of blade length.

  32. I’ve got a question. According to California Law, “Misleading knives are illegal. These
    include: cane knives (and shobi-zues), lipstick knives, belt knives, pen
    knives, air gauge knives, and pen knives”

    What if a manufacturer of one of these items Visibly Prints the words “Knife” or “Knife Inside”. Does this make the knife Legal to buy/sell/posses? Can one argue in court that it’s not misleading when it states in plain english there is a knife inside??

    1. In any other state except California, yes, one could argue using logic and reason. I think you forgot that you typed ‘California” and “argue in court” in the same general line of questioning. It is California we are talking about…

    2. Yes, because not all people can read and not all people can read the language in which those words are printed. So if the law states that by visual inspection the knife looks and may feel as though it is anything but a knife, having the words on there makes no difference. Hope that helps.

  33. Can I carry my hunting knife? it’s a case xx fixed blade , $even inches long. I carry it in a sheath. I live in Va.

    1. This is a case where you need to know the local laws for where you plan to possess, transport, and use the knife.

      Let me explain. Most fixed blade knives have two items that are looked at for the laws. Blade Length and Full Length = Blade plus handle. In most states (I haven’t looked up yours at this time) state that a knives blade must not exceed 4 inches and the full size must not exceed 9 inches, however, this is just a conservative average across the country and your area may be different. However, lets say that your knife is a fixed hunting or fixed fillet knife who;s lengths are longer then what I mentioned. Does that mean that you as a hunter can not carry that knife perhaps not. It may have special rules at that point for your age and how you are transporting the knife. Since children under 18 are allowed to hunt and fish, surely they need to be able to process the harvest, so a lot of places institute specific possession and transportation restrictions on minors.

      Example, Jimmy is 12, hunting in NJ with his family. In NJ a knife fixed or folding must not exceed a blade over 4 inches and a full open length of 9 inches. If little Jimmy happens to have a knife larger it does not mean that he cant not possess one. however because he is a minor, when he is traveling in a vehicle or bicycle, his knife MUST remain in it’s Sheath and LOCKED in a toolbox or tackle box (lock and key locked) and he must not have the knife concealed anywhere on his person. He can still use the knife legally. Again however, these restrictions can be both State and local jurisdiction and the two may not agree.

      Knifeup.com does a very awesome job at providing all with a very comprehensive look at the State Laws, but the State Laws are merely a TINY portion of the laws you need to be familiar with as you need to really understand the laws in the jurisdictions which you plan on using and travelling with any knife.

      Always remember that State law generally sets the presidence on how the municipalities write their laws, however, because a state decriminalizes a law, it does not mean that ANY local jurisdiction will adopt that change and why it is so important to know State Law when on state land or road, but equally as important are your local jurisdictional laws. You can no longer be charged with a felony for a specif knife, but a local law can just as quick throw you in jail on a civic violation.

      My suggestion to you is to learn abou the local laws in the areas you live and plan to use your fixed blade knife and follow these rules, and not worry so much about what the state allows, unless the state considers the law a felony in which case they can pick you up with out regard for civil law.

      Not sure if that helped but I hope so.

    2. This is a case where you need to know the local laws for where you plan to possess, transport, and use the knife.

      Let me explain. Most fixed blade knives have two items that are looked at for the laws. Blade Length and Full Length = Blade plus handle. In most states (I haven’t looked up yours at this time) state that a knives blade must not exceed 4 inches and the full size must not exceed 9 inches, however, this is just a conservative average across the country and your area may be different. However, lets say that your knife is a fixed hunting or fixed fillet knife who;s lengths are longer then what I mentioned. Does that mean that you as a hunter can not carry that knife perhaps not. It may have special rules at that point for your age and how you are transporting the knife. Since children under 18 are allowed to hunt and fish, surely they need to be able to process the harvest, so a lot of places institute specific possession and transportation restrictions on minors.

      Example, Jimmy is 12, hunting in NJ with his family. In NJ a knife fixed or folding must not exceed a blade over 4 inches and a full open length of 9 inches. If little Jimmy happens to have a knife larger it does not mean that he cant not possess one. however because he is a minor, when he is traveling in a vehicle or bicycle, his knife MUST remain in it’s Sheath and LOCKED in a toolbox or tackle box (lock and key locked) and he must not have the knife concealed anywhere on his person. He can still use the knife legally. Again however, these restrictions can be both State and local jurisdiction and the two may not agree.

      Knifeup.com does a very awesome job at providing all with a very comprehensive look at the State Laws, but the State Laws are merely a TINY portion of the laws you need to be familiar with as you need to really understand the laws in the jurisdictions which you plan on using and travelling with any knife.

      Always remember that State law generally sets the presidence on how the municipalities write their laws, however, because a state decriminalizes a law, it does not mean that ANY local jurisdiction will adopt that change and why it is so important to know State Law when on state land or road, but equally as important are your local jurisdictional laws. You can no longer be charged with a felony for a specif knife, but a local law can just as quick throw you in jail on a civic violation.

      My suggestion to you is to learn abou the local laws in the areas you live and plan to use your fixed blade knife and follow these rules, and not worry so much about what the state allows, unless the state considers the law a felony in which case they can pick you up with out regard for civil law.

      Not sure if that helped but I hope so.

  34. this is not right Missouri you can have a swich blade what thy have is the old law I spent a week talking to tsa fbi Missouri attorney general sheriff prosecuting attorney lets just say alphabet soup!!!! you google it and the old law comes up but that is no more I was told thy Are legal.

    1. You may be correct. However, nobody should ever take ANYBODY’s “word for it,” even when that person is an agent/officer/employee of the agency/department/city/county/state (or the US, for that matter). People make mistakes all the time. People are ill-informed all the time. People are not completely-up-to-date all the time on the latest *signed* legislation even when they are supposed to be the authority on some matter. UNLESS you have seen some law/regulation/legally enforceable rule IN WRITING (official government printed publication or website that states you can, can not, may, may not, shall, or shall not do something), then do NOT do (or refrain from doing) that thing or you may in fact be violating a law. It is always better to be safe than sorry when it comes to the issue of possession of a weapon (knife, gun or anything that may be construed as a weapon (pepper spray, stun gun, spiked baseball bat) either in your home, on your person, in a vehicle, or other (e.g. in a tent or backpack). Ignorance of the law is no excuse if you get arrested or have your non-compliant “thing” confiscated.

    2. You are correct that on a State Level Missouri did repeal the law on Switchblades, however, just because the state law was repealed, does not mean that all local laws have followed suite, and that is what is important. It may be perfectly OK to have one in City or Town A but go to City or Town B and you can still be charged with a Crime. While it would no longer constitute as a Felony since Feloney are indicted by breaking State and Federal Law, it does not mean that you can freely carry or even own a switchblade anywhere in the state or even cross jurisdictions with one.

      In the case of pretty much all knives, there are a set of simple guideline you can go by to get a generalized understanding of the knife laws in the US in general, however, it still comes down to the laws, restrictions, and regulation of the jurisdiction that you are in with such a knife. understand.

      Here are some easy general rules to follow with all these “Dangerous Knives” as these were listed in all states.

      1. Since only a small number of states have rescinded the law on Switchblades (in this case we are talking about Missouri specifically, always assume that from a state level, ALL Switchblades, Stilettos, Daggers, Gravity Knives, Sharpened Swords, Automatic and Push Button Knives, or any knife considered to have no functional use other than to be a dangerous concealed weapon. This is the reason that some many states have made these illegal over the years because federal law states that ANY knife carried with the intent to causes severe injury or death or for the commission of a crime is at that point considered illegal. Which means that your 2.5 in liner locking pocket knife you use to cut your fishing line with, automatically becomes illegal if your sole purpose for carrying that knife to to cause harm or be used to commit a crime (ie use it for unlawful purposes. ALL knives fall under this law regardless of how tiny, cute or functional they are, including a butter knife.

      Since at the time the laws regarding the above listed knives we put in, no one has shown that there was any practical use (utilitarian or other) but rather only be used to conceal the knife for intent to commission a crime or other unlawful purpose almost all states followed suit and made them illegal as well. Assume, unless you know for a fact other wise, that they are illegal in your state or jurisdiction. (Please also note that while the law was repealing such a few number of states, the ones that have very well may still have mitigating factors that could potentially still make them illegal such a felon still can not possess them, nor can certain mentally ill individuals.) So their are cases where they are still noted as a Felony even in states who repealed the law for the average law abiding citizen. So to be safe assume illegal unless you know for a fact they have repealed the law and that the local jurisdiction for where you choose to carry your knife through and at it’s final destination have repealed their laws as well.

      2. Just because the state repealed the law, does NOT automatically mean that all Counties in the state, and all towns, cities, and local jurisdictions have repealed their laws on those knives including the Switchblade and all Auto Push Button Knives. The violation may no longer be a felony, but could still be a gross misdemeanor and could carry time. This would be considered a Civil violation verses a Criminal Violation and while the terms of the broken law may be different the punishment can be the same or similar. So, to protect yourself, please do NOT just assume because Missouri Repealed the Felony Law regarding the sale, possession, and transport of this item, it does not mean your free to carry your Switchblade with impunity through the entire state.

      Important example, you may have purchased in a town where they are legal, you may live in a town where they are legal but you may have to travel through 5 cities where they are still a civil crime to possess, which means if you were to get pulled over in that jurisdiction, and they have them illegal still, you can still be charged with a crime. It will not be a felony (unless your a felon, carrying for unlawful purposes, or have a specific mental illness in which you are not allowed to pretty much own any weapon for fear of hurting yourself or others,

      Also understanding how the law has changed is important as well here.
      The new law, signed on July 14, 2012 and effective immediately, doesn’t word it as clearly, but here’s the main part of the bill concerning knives:

      1. A person commits a crime if such person knowingly possesses, manufactures, transports, repairs, or sells:
      Any of the following in violation of federal law:
      (d) A switchblade knife.

      What that essentially means is that it is still a crime to carry a switchblade, but only when it violates federal law. According to Knife Rights, that’s limited to interstate commerce, Indian reservations and anywhere federal regulations exist like national parks.

      The ban on switchblades and automatics has been repealed in Missouri, but it doesn’t necessarily give you free range to carry a switchblade wherever you go in the state. Aside from carrying them on federal lands, local laws may vary because there doesn’t seem to be any preemption statute to unify the law throughout the state.

      I hope this has help to clear up any confusion you all may have had regarding this. I own a company that sells a lot of knives through out the world and believe me since this is my company, I wanted to make sure I knew all of my risks and the laws before I took on the responsibility of selling knives, and for me the bottom line is that the buyer is responsible for understanding ALL Federal, State, and local jurisdictional laws regarding the knife they choose to buy. If I know that they live in a area in which a certain knife is illegal, I refuse to sell that knife but since I can not possibly know every local jurisdiction laws, I base the laws on the state level, the buyer is then responsible for the laws where they will possess and use it, and if they get in trouble there isn’t anything anyone can do about that.

      This is why I say the State Felony law may have been repealed in Missouri, but it is still buyer beware to know your local jurisdictional laws for where you tend to possess, travel with, and use the knife because those are the laws that will get you and you telling that officer, “Sir, the state has rescinded the law making it legal to possess a Switchblade, that Cop can easily tell you well that’s fine and good if you were on State property, but your in this little town and there is still a civil violation carrying upto X months in jail. Well in this case, that rescinding of the State law has not helped you one bit.

      I just ask you be informed all the way down to the local laws. Don’t make any assumptions based on the State law. And most of all, Please be safe!!

    3. Again, please read my multiple replies to this exact topic. The state law rescindment does NOT make the knife legal through out the state. It merely removes the felony law regarding switchblades on STATE property only. This does NOT change the local laws which govern civil law in which the majority of jurisdictions still have local laws against these knives.

      You can liken this debate to the states who have legalized marijuana. Just because a state has decriminalized put, does not mean that a Federal officer can not come to your pot legal state and arrest you for your bud since it is still illegal Federally.

      The opposite is the same for the Switchblade where in this case the higher Authority has decriminalized the Switchblades but most municipalities still have civil laws on the books that are just as enforceable and can lead to your arrest, fine, and confiscation regardless of the fact that the State Law has made them legal under specific circumstances.

      Hope that helps.

  35. I tried to contact the webmaster of this site but he made no link. The information on here about the knife laws in Tennessee are outdated and incorrect.

    Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam has signed SB1771, Knife Rights’ bill repealing the state’s antiquated ban on switchblade (automatic) knives and possession of knives over four inches in length “with intent to go armed,” a vague law subject to abusive interpretation. As of July 1, 2014, there are no longer any per se illegal knives in Tennessee.

    This is what y’all want: http://www.akti.org/wp-content/uploads/AKTI-state-automatic-laws1.jpg

    1. First off, ‘Murica.
      Second off, leave it to the Southern states to be the first to grow a goddamned set when deciding weapon laws. Than kyou (on behalf of a pretty liberal state [kinda sucks]).
      Thirdly, Oregon’s laws are pretty loose, but I cannot find anything in the statutes limiting blades to a certain length of any type. Does a KA-BAR fall into the utility purpose as far as hiking and outdoors adventuring is considered? If anyone has helpful information regarding this, I would greatly appreciate it.

    2. Hi The Federal Farmer! The problem right now is that there are so few states that have actually repealed the law on a State / Felony Level, and for those that have, guess what, the larger problem is that the local municipalities mostly have not changed their local laws.

      So what does that mean for a site that want to provide the most comprehensive set of laws for knives? Well just because the state says it’s OK, does not mean one has a free pass to carry a Switchblade anywhere in the state. While the person may not longer face felony charges, (unless they are a convicted felon already, possess the knife for unlawful purposes, have certain mental illnesses in which you can become a danger to yourself or others) and can freely carry and use on State Land for lawful purposes, they may still be charged with a civil violation and matching fines or jail time at the majority of local jurisdictions.

      What I am trying to say simply is that the majority of the state likely still has some form of restrictional / civil laws on these knives so removing the State Law and Felony status technically has little baring on the legality of the knife in any none state owned land, and therefore it may be an accurate statement to say that the state of Texas has legalized the Switchblades but that only helps you on state property while 95% of local governments still have them illegal at a civic level.

      That being said, does it really make sense to qualify these knives as legal in an entire state where most of the local governments still out law them?

      While I agree, the states that have rescinded the laws should be identified, but heavy caution needs to be placed on that since that does not mean that they are legal for you to purchase or own where you live. They need to be careful how they word these states that have removed the Felony status / laws on these knives without misleading people to think that it is now legal to take your switchblade anywhere you choose inside that state.

      I hope you understand what I was trying to explain. If I can be of further help, please reply here. Cheers!

  36. I share Lee Bell’s difficulties. All of my questions about knife laws begin with ‘where’ and what I really want to know is which states are off limits with particular blades.

    Please consider adding a way for visitors to select the characteristics of a knife and how they intend to carry it. Then, depending on that input, provide an overview of which states allow such a blade. Ideally, I would suggest color-coding the map.

    For example, someone might select fixed, 4″ blade, open carry. Then he or she would see in which states a knife like that would be perfectly legal, in which states it is completely and utterly illegal, in which states it varies by municipality, and in which states a permit is required.

    This is the most accessible resource for knife law I’ve found, so I hope this feature request doesn’t come across as unappreciative or lazy. I just think that indexing basic knife criteria would be useful to a lot of people.

    Thanks.

  37. Information on the types of knives that can be owned and how they may be carried is quite useful, thanks.

    What I came here to find out, however, does not seem to be covered. My question is not whether, or what I can carrry, but where I can carry it. Specifically, I live in Florida and will be traveling in Wyoming and South Dakota in the near future. I need to know what the restrrictions are for carry in various places including bars, government buildings, police departments, etc.

  38. Wisconsin now has Concealed Carry weapons permits. This alows you to carry a knife concealed. Still illegal to carry a switch blade though.

    1. What’s the law on open carry like on your hip or on the dash of your car ??

  39. And I thought we in America lived in a free society but yet it is illegal to carry a knife. It seems that today you could get arrested for just about anything but yet the people who are committing real crimes get away with it and people who are trying to defend themselves get the shaft.

  40. YES! I’ve been struggling to get clarity on knife laws for a while. This is a very useful resource!

  41. Hello,

    I recently came across your site and noticed that the state of Kansas’ section has not been updated to reflect the new laws that took effect in summer of 2013.

    “HB2033 repeals all existing local knife laws in Kansas and enacts statewide preemption of any attempt to pass new local knife laws more restrictive than state law. HB2033 also repeals the ban on the possession of switchblades, dirks, daggers and stilettos.”

  42. so are you saying that it is legal to own and carry a switch blade in Utah?

  43. This is a great resource. I found one area where I was potentially illegal and didn’t even know it. Thank you very much!

  44. Map does not work in safari, could you add a list of states or a drop down menu, Thanks

  45. As of July 15, 2013 the ownership and carrying of switchblades in Kansas is now legal. You may want to research this and other states for new laws just put in.

  46. Are not knives covered under the 2nd amendment also?
    Fewer politicians, more statesmen.

  47. Even with graphics and javascript on, I can’t get the map to load. Can you perhaps but a postal abbrev for the states with a hot link to the laws of that state. Thanks Rich

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