14c28n

Sandvik 14c28n Steel Review

The Sandvik 14c28n steel is ideal for the manufacturing of knife blades This Steel grade allows for the highest attainable hardness without the compromising of micro-structure integrity. This steel is often used in high-end knives by top-shelf manufacturers. It is also a good choice for custom knife makers.


Sandvik 14c28n Properties

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The Kershaw Blur is a great 14C28N knife. Click on photo to see a larger version.

With Sandvik 14c28n, re-edging along with edge retention is maintained with ease. Resistance to microchipping, rolling or folding of the edge is better than decent. A 55-62 HRC hardness recommendation makes this a Knife Steel that is ideal for a number of blade applications, such as Folding Knives or Pocket Knives. A high corrosion resistance lends to a particular appeal in moisture intense applications such as a Chef would encounter. With a 55-62 hardness recommendation, any application where sharpness retention is an issue would appreciate this steels property. Sandvik 14C28N is fine-blankable which will translate into a smooth production process.

Real World Performance

Here is what was found out about Sandvik 14c28n when used in real-world scenarios. The steel was used in a fixed blade knife design. First, after spiral cutting through 10 heavy cardboard postal mailing tubes, it would still shave the hair off an arm. After going through 20 tubes it would no longer shave hair but would still slice through paper with relative ease. After 34 cardboard tubes, the tubes would start to tear instead of slice and it no longer cleanly sliced the paper. When you consider that all these tubes were 2-1/2 feet in length, this is pretty good edge retention.

 

Favorite Knife using 14c28n Steel

Kershaw Hen & Rooster KS1670OLTS Blur Liner Lock A/O Tiger St Hunting Knives

The Kershaw Hen & Rooster Tiger Stripe Blur Liner Lock

 

Check Latest Pricing : Amazon | BladeHQ 

The Kershaw Blur features a Black Tiger Stripe finished blade with a plain edge and an OD green aluminum handle with Trac-Tek inserts for superior gripping power in all conditions. Black reversible pocket clip for tip-up or down carry.

The Kershaw Blur is a favorite among knife enthusiasts. The Blur has the build and performance of a great general purpose knife with everyday carry friendly attributes as well. The Ken Onion designed Blur is an assisted opening knife, just give the blade a push with the ambidextrous thumb stud and the Speed Safe technology finishes opening the blade! To close, just slide the liner lock to release the blade.  

I personally own a blur and yes, that part about it being a favorite among knife enthusiasts – it’s TRUE!


Rod Testing

A “Brass Rod Test” was also performed on this steel and the flexibility is very impressive, there was no evidence of chipping or deformation of the edge. The point was tested by repeatedly stabbing through a number of tin cans, then by hammering it through stainless steel sheeting of 0.5mm density. Although the point was somewhat blunted, it didn’t chip or roll. The durability of the steel was evident after it was repeatedly thrown into seasoned wood planking for over ten minutes, this was done after having been hammered through the 0.5mm thick metal sheeting mentioned above.

Finally, this knife manufactured with Sandvik 14c28n steel was placed in a pail of saltwater for close to 4 days after which no apparent corrosion was discernible. This Steel is very receptive to sharpening and to holding an edge with use. It is strong yet flexible and will perform admirably in multiple applications.

Conclusion

Sandvik 14c28n steel is a great material from which to make a knife. If you are considering buying a knife made of Sandvik 14c28n, do it! I can not recommend this steel any higher.

If you enjoyed this article, check out our guide to machetes. You should not use 14c28n for machetes but everyone knows that machetes are cool. Three pink pocket knives that your wife will love.


 

Peter Stec
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Comments

  1. 14c28n is an ok mid range edc steel.mostly good but any harder steel is hard to sharpen but 14c28n holds edge good for average people’s edc knives.most people who are not knife snobs can’t sharpen good. That’s my experience

  2. I have a Kershaw Skyline made with Sandvik 14C28N stainless steel. It’s my EDC. Edge retention is great… but it takes some work to get the edge. That should be expected. Compared to the 440 Boker I have, the Skyline always ends up back in my pocket (so I bought two, because I mislay it often). The 440 I have in the Boker may not have been fully hardened; or it is and the 440 just won’t perform as well. I can get an edge with the Boker 440, but not as sharp as the Skyline.

  3. I’ve carried my Kershaw Leek in 14c28n a couple of months now, and its a hell of a razor. A few strops on my Arkansas stone after I got it and I havn’t had to sharpen it since. Perfect steel if your looking for that sort of edge, takes a good bit of abuse, though I myself don’t beat the hell out of it. Couldn’t recommend enough, great everyday carry.

  4. Supposedly 14c28n is a modification of 13c26 razor steel with nitrogen and chromium added for Wear resistance

  5. If i spend 30 t0 60 bucks on a knife and it comes with 14c28n i know from experience that i got a blade that will work well and hone with ease. Always satisfied with 14c28n. If i spend 150 $ and up, i expect something better. But with better steel i know i will have to spend more time to get sharp. 14c28n not a super steel but it satisfies my expectations.

  6. I just purchased my first 14c28n blade and anxious to see how it holds up to my everyday life of blade use! I currently own a Buck Vantage Pro with the S30V steel and it is awesome compared to my old 8Cr13MoV blades. Using them everyday to cut wire, paper, rope, and everything else, I’ve gotten very good at sharpening blades freehand. When i first used my new S30V blade I just knew it was on it’s way to being dull at the end of the day. But I soon found out it was holding a razor edge way longer than any knife I’ve ever used! When it finally gets to dull to shave I also found out it’s much harder to sharpen than any of my other knives. I run a 17 degree angle on my edges out of habit which makes it easier for me to sharpen time after time. Im ready to see how the 14c28n works out.

    1. Yeah ,you’re gonna want to strop those higher end steels to keep them sharp after daily use. If maintained regularly you shouldnt have to sharpen them alot.

  7. No offense, but this review doesn’t tell me much. How does this steel compare to 154CM, VG10, S30V, 13C26, 440C, etc.? Without a comparison to other commonly used knife steels, all we have is a bit of information but no idea where it fits.

    1. Plenty of camparisons. I have a file folder full of web sites that do just that. Use google and do some research. A quick overview is all this was intended to be and it is a good one. I have 60 knives or more and take a look at the various steels under a microscope and do some sharpening and use the knife and get a grip on the fact that no one steel does it all , but this one will out perform the average users needs day in and day out and not cost a fortune or take overly specialized skills to sharpen.

    2. I agree, this take my word for it I’m an expert on knife blades does not help me either. No offense intended, you probably have forgotten more than I will ever know about these things I need more to make a buying decision on a knife when the one I have seems fine.

    3. George you realise you just put yourself down in that statement don’t you!?
      Your ego is disconcerting.

  8. How does Sandvik 14C28N compare with S30V? My favorite older Kershaw is S30V and it sharpens easily for me and stays sharp using the Syyderco sharpening triangle sticks. That is truly the extent of my knife knowledge except I’ve been carrying a knife every day since I was a kid in NYC starting about 1939 and I use one at least ten times a day for any task you can think of.

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